Reuters: Survivors of the Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting in Parkland, Florida File a Federal Lawsuit Saying Authorities ”Failed to Act” Linda So Reports

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Gun violence in the United States results in tens of thousands of deaths and injuries annually.[1] In 2013, there were 73,505 nonfatal firearm injuries (23.2 injuries per 100,000 U.S. citizens),[2][3] and 33,636 deaths due to “injury by firearms” (10.6 deaths per 100,000 U.S. citizens).[4] These deaths consisted of 11,208 homicides,[5]21,175 suicides,[4] 505 deaths due to accidental or negligent discharge of a firearm, and 281 deaths due to firearms use with “undetermined intent”.[4] The ownership and control of guns are among the most widely debated issues in the country.

In 2012, there were 8,855 total firearm-related homicides in the US, with 6,371 of those attributed to handguns.[6] In 2012, 64% of all gun-related deaths in the U.S. were suicides.[7] In 2010, there were 19,392 firearm-related suicides, and 11,078 firearm-related homicides in the U.S.[8] In 2010, 358 murders were reported involving a rifle while 6,009 were reported involving a handgun; another 1,939 were reported with an unspecified type of firearm.[9]

Firearms were used to kill 13,286 people in the U.S. in 2015, excluding suicide.[10] Approximately 1.4 million people have been killed using firearms in the U.S. between 1968 and 2011. This number includes all deaths resulting from a firearm, including suicides, homicides, and accidents.[10]

Compared to 22 other high-income nations, the U.S. gun-related murder rate is 25 times higher.[11] Although it has half the population of the other 22 nations combined, the U.S. had 82 percent of all gun deaths, 90 percent of all women killed with guns, 91 percent of children under 14 and 92 percent of young people between ages 15 and 24 killed with guns.[11]

Gun violence is most common in poor urban areas and frequently associated with gang violence, often involving male juveniles or young adult males.[12][13] Although mass shootings have been covered extensively in the media, mass shootings in the US account for a small fraction of gun-related deaths[14] and the frequency of these events steadily declined between 1994 and 2007, rising between 2007 and 2013.[15][16]

Legislation at the federal, state, and local levels has attempted to address gun violence through a variety of methods, including restricting firearms purchases by youths and other “at-risk” populations, setting waiting periods for firearm purchases, establishing gun buyback programs, law enforcement and policing strategies, stiff sentencing of gun law violators, education programs for parents and children, and community-outreach programs. Despite widespread concern about the impacts of gun violence on public health, Congress has prohibited the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) from conducting research that advocates in favor of gun control.[17] The CDC has interpreted this ban to extend to all research on gun violence prevention, and so has not funded any research on this subject since 1996.[18]

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