When it Comes to Life & Death and Quality of Life Issues, Ryan Greeted with “F-ck You” Screams

When it comes to, not only “Life and Death” issues, but the “Quality of Life” such as health insurance, perhaps the Republicans does not know that the party is playing with fire. The fire can be seen in a report by Politicususa.

Politicuausa reports (source) with the herad-line: “Crowd Boos And Screams F**k You At Paul Ryan As Trumpcare Disaster Grows For GOP.”

As Paul Ryan was leaving Success Academy charter school in Harlem Tuesday afternoon, he got loudly and angrily booed and people chanted, “Healthcare for all not just Paul!” There were also “F*ck you!” chants, and there were a lot of them.

To say that the American people have an issue with Republican Speaker Paul Ryan after he ushered through a healthcare bill to take healthcare away from millions of Americans would be an understatement.

As Paul Ryan was leaving Success Academy charter school in Harlem Tuesday afternoon, he got loudly and angrily booed and people chanted, “Healthcare for all not just Paul!”

There were also “F*ck you!” chants, and there were a lot of them.

Watch here via independent video journalist Sandi Bachom, who noted, “got the shot, video coming, they are booing him mercilessly.” And in a later tweet to me, she noted that Ryan came out when everybody was leaving, “I waited two hours for this puppy, he tried to fake us out, came when everybody was leaving.”

Protesters met Ryan on his way in with chants of “Shame!” They carried signs reading, among other things, “Healthcare is a human right!”

House Republicans kept Obamacare for House Republicans in their bill, while giving Trumpcare to the rest of us, which is why protesters were screaming “Healthcare for all, not just Paul!” Republicans said they would be passing yet another bill to change that, but for some reason left it out of the bill they passed for our healthcare.

The following is a look at health care & health insurance

in America

Health care in the United States is provided by many distinct organizations.[1] Health care facilities are largely owned and operated by private sector businesses. 58% of US community hospitals are non-profit, 21% are government owned, and 21% are for-profit.[2] According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the United States spent more on health care per capita ($8,608), and more on health care as percentage of its GDP (17%), than any other nation in 2011.

64% of health spending was paid for by the government in 2013,[3][4] funded via programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, and the Veterans Health Administration. People aged under 67 acquire insurance via their or a family member’s employer, by purchasing health insurance on their own, or are uninsured. Health insurance for public sector employees is primarily provided by the government.

The United States life expectancy of 79.8 years at birth, up from 75.2 years in 1990, ranks it 42nd among 224 nations, and 22th out of the 35 industrialized OECD countries, down from 20th in 1990.[5][6] Of 17 high-income countries studied by the National Institutes of Health in 2013, the United States had the highest or near-highest prevalence of obesity, car accidents, infant mortality, heart and lung disease, sexually transmitted infections, adolescent pregnancies, injuries, and homicides. On average, a U.S. male can be expected to live almost four fewer years than those in the top-ranked country, though notably Americans aged 75 live longer than those who reach that age in other developed nations.[7] A 2014 survey of the healthcare systems of 11 developed countries found the US healthcare system to be the most expensive and worst-performing in terms of health access, efficiency, and equity.[8]

Americans undergo cancer screenings at significantly higher rates than people in other developed countries, and access MRI and CT scans at the highest rate of any OECD nation.[9] Diabetics are more likely to receive treatment and meet treatment targets in the U.S. than in Canada, England, or Scotland.[10][11]

Gallup recorded that the uninsured rate among U.S. adults was 11.9% for the first quarter of 2015, continuing the decline of the uninsured rate outset by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).[12] A 2012 study for the years 2002–2008 found that about 25% of all senior citizens declared bankruptcy due to medical expenses, and 43% were forced to mortgage or sell their primary residence.[13]

In 2010 the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) became law, providing for major changes in health insurance. Under the act, hospitals and primary physicians would change their practices financially, technologically, and clinically to drive better health outcomes, lower costs, and improve their methods of distribution and accessibility. The Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of most of the law in June 2012 and affirmed insurance exchange subsidies in all states in June 2015.[14]

In the United States, health insurance is any program that helps pay for medical expenses, whether through privately purchased insurance, social insurance or a social welfare program funded by the government.[1] Synonyms for this usage include “health coverage,” “health care coverage” and “health benefits.”

In a more technical sense, the term is used to describe any form of insurance that provides protection against the costs of medical services. This usage includes private insurance and social insurance programs such as Medicare, which pools resources and spreads the financial risk associated with major medical expenses across the entire population to protect everyone, as well as social welfare programs such as Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, which provide assistance to people who cannot afford health coverage.

In addition to medical expense insurance, “health insurance” may also refer to insurance covering disability or long-term nursing or custodial care needs. Different health insurance provides different levels of financial protection and the scope of coverage can vary widely, with more than 40 percent of insured individuals reporting that their plans do not adequately meet their needs as of 2007.[2]

The share of Americans without health insurance has been cut in half since 2013. Many of the reforms instituted by the Affordable Care Act of 2010 were designed to extend health care coverage to those without it, however high cost growth continues unabated.[3] National health expenditures are projected to grow 4.7% per person per year from 2016-2025. Public healthcare spending was 29% of federal mandated spending in 1990, 35% in 2000, and is projected to be roughly half in 2025.[4]

Persistent lack of insurance among many working Americans continued to create pressure for a comprehensive national health insurance system. In the early 1970s, there was fierce debate between two alternative models for universal coverage. Senator Ted Kennedy proposed a universal single-payer system, while President Nixon countered with his own proposal based on mandates and incentives for employers to provide coverage while expanding publicly run coverage for low-wage workers and the unemployed. Compromise was never reached, and Nixon’s resignation and a series of economic problems later in the decade diverted Congress’s attention away from health reform.

Shortly after his inauguration, President Clinton offered a new proposal for a universal health insurance system. Like Nixon’s plan, Clinton’s relied on mandates, both for individuals and for insurers, along with subsidies for people who could not afford insurance. The bill would have also created “health-purchasing alliances” to pool risk among multiple businesses and large groups of individuals. The plan was staunchly opposed by the insurance industry and employers’ groups and received only mild support from liberal groups, particularly unions, which preferred a single payer system. Ultimately it failed after the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994.[28]

Finally achieving universal health coverage remained a top priority among Democrats, and passing a health reform bill was one of the Obama Administration’s top priorities. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was similar to the Nixon and Clinton plans, mandating coverage, penalizing employers who failed to provide it, and creating mechanisms for people to pool risk and buy insurance collectively.[7] Earlier versions of the bill included a publicly run insurer that could compete to cover those without employer sponsored coverage (the so-called public option), but this was ultimately stripped to secure the support of moderates. The bill passed the Senate in December 2009 with all Democrats voting in favor and the House in March 2010 with the support of most Democrats. Not a single Republican voted in favor of it either time.

Public programs provide the primary source of coverage for most seniors and also low-income children and families who meet certain eligibility requirements. The primary public programs are Medicare, a federal social insurance program for seniors (generally persons aged 65 and over) and certain disabled individuals; Medicaid, funded jointly by the federal government and states but administered at the state level, which covers certain very low income children and their families; and SCHIP, also a federal-state partnership that serves certain children and families who do not qualify for Medicaid but who cannot afford private coverage. Other public programs include military health benefits provided through TRICARE and the Veterans Health Administration and benefits provided through the Indian Health Service. Some states have additional programs for low-income individuals.[29] In 2011, approximately 60 percent of stays were billed to Medicare and Medicaid—up from 52 percent in 1997.[30]

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s