Trump’s Crappy Mexico? With Nuclear Weapons Potential & Planet’s 15th Largest GDP, Mexico Mulls Global Security Role

Mexico is no “Third-Rate” back-ward developing country, Trump makes the country out to be for Americans. Its economy is the Planet’s 15th largest GDP and the 11th largest by purchasing power parity. The country achieved ability to produce nuclear weapons grade uranium since 1970 and WSJ ranking of higher education, gives Mexico’s education institutions high marks. IPADE and EGADE, the business schools of Universidad Panamericana and of Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education respectively, were ranked in the top 10 in a survey conducted by The Wall Street Journal among recruiters outside the United States.[309]

Mexico deserves some respect from Trump. And Trump’s calling Mexican, as a group with generalization, of them being rapist, is not acceptable. Trump should apologies. Concerning the Mexican Wall, America has jurisdiction of what America does inside America, but broadcasting that Mexico will pay for it, is also insulting. And the fact is, more Mexicans are leaving America than Mexicans entering America, and a great number of Americans, estimates in the 10s of 100,000s have migrated to Mexico.

Foreign Relations:

The foreign relations of Mexico are directed by the President of Mexico[130] and managed through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.[131] The principles of the foreign policy are constitutionally recognized in the Article 89, Section 10, which include: respect for international law and legal equality of states, their sovereignty and independence, non-intervention in the domestic affairs of other countries, peaceful resolution of conflicts, and promotion of collective security through active participation in international organizations.[130] Since the 1930s, the Estrada Doctrine has served as a crucial complement to these principles.[132]

Mexico is one of the founding members of several international organizations, most notably the United Nations,[133] the Organization of American States,[134] the Organization of Ibero-American States,[135] the OPANAL[136] and the Rio Group.[137] In 2008, Mexico contributed over 40 million dollars to the United Nations regular budget.[138] In addition, it was the only Latin American member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development since it joined in 1994 until Chile gained full membership in 2010.[139][140]

Mexico is considered a regional power[141][142] hence its presence in major economic groups such as the G8+5 and the G-20. In addition, since the 1990s Mexico has sought a reform of the United Nations Security Council and its working methods[143] with the support of Canada, Italy, Pakistan and other nine countries, which form a group informally called the Coffee Club.[144]

After the War of Independence, the relations of Mexico were focused primarily on the United States, its northern neighbor, largest trading partner,[145] and the most powerful actor in hemispheric and world affairs.[146] Mexico supported the Cuban government since its establishment in the early 1960s,[147] the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua during the late 1970s,[148] and leftist revolutionary groups in El Salvador during the 1980s.[149] Felipe Calderón‘s administration put a greater emphasis on relations with Latin America and the Caribbean.[150]

Military Power:

Global Firepower ranking, based largely on each nation’s potential conventional war-making capability across land, sea and air, not including nuclear, ranked Mexico as 31 of 126, with a score of 0.6286 (0.0000 being perfect). The ranking incorporates values related to resources, finances and geography and over 50 different factors.

Mexico has the capabilities to manufacture nuclear weapons, but abandoned this possibility with the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1968 and pledged to only use its nuclear technology for peaceful purposes.[158] In 1970, Mexico’s national institute for nuclear research successfully refined weapons grade uranium[159][not in citation given] which is used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons but in April 2010, Mexico agreed to turn over its weapons grade uranium to the United States.[160][161]

Historically, Mexico has remained neutral in international conflicts,[162] with the exception of World War II. However, in recent years some political parties have proposed an amendment of the Constitution in order to allow the Mexican Army, Air Force or Navy to collaborate with the United Nations in peacekeeping missions, or to provide military help to countries that officially ask for it.[163]

The Mexican Armed Forces have two branches: the Mexican Army (which includes the Mexican Air Force), and the Mexican Navy. The Mexican Armed Forces maintain significant infrastructure, including facilities for design, research, and testing of weapons, vehicles, aircraft, naval vessels, defense systems and electronics;[151][152] military industry manufacturing centers for building such systems, and advanced naval dockyards that build heavy military vessels and advanced missile technologies.[153]

In recent years, Mexico has improved its training techniques, military command and information structures and has taken steps to becoming more self-reliant in supplying its military by designing as well as manufacturing its own arms,[154] missiles,[152] aircraft,[155] vehicles, heavy weaponry, electronics,[151] defense systems,[151] armor, heavy military industrial equipment and heavy naval vessels.[156] Since the 1990s, when the military escalated its role in the war on drugs, increasing importance has been placed on acquiring airborne surveillance platforms, aircraft, helicopters, digital war-fighting technologies,[151] urban warfare equipment and rapid troop transport.[157]

Economic Power:

Mexico has the Planet’s 15th largest nominal GDP and the 11th largest by purchasing power parity. GDP annual average growth for the period of 1995–2002 was 5.1%.[87] Mexico’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in purchasing power parity (PPP) was estimated at US $2.2602 trillion in 2015. Mexico’s GDP in PPP per capita was US $18,714.05. Mexico is now firmly established as an upper middle-income country. After the slowdown of 2001 the country has recovered and has grown 4.2, 3.0 and 4.8 percent in 2004, 2005 and 2006,[170] even though it is considered to be well below Mexico’s potential growth.[171] Furthermore, after the 2008–2009 recession, the economy grew an average of 3.32 percent per year from 2010 to 2014.

According to a 2008 UN report the average income in a typical urbanized area of Mexico was $26,654, while the average income in rural areas just miles away was only $8,403.[177] Daily minimum wages are set annually by law and determined by zone; $67.29 Mexican pesos ($5.13 USD) in Zone A and $63.77 Mexican pesos ($4.86 USD) in Zone B.[178]

The electronics industry of Mexico has grown enormously within the last decade. Mexico has the sixth largest electronics industry in the world after China, United States, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. Mexico is the second largest exporter of electronics to the United States where it exported $71.4 billion worth of electronics in 2011.[179] The Mexican electronics industry is dominated by the manufacture and OEM design of televisions, displays, computers, mobile phones, circuit boards, semiconductors, electronic appliances, communications equipment and LCD modules. The Mexican electronics industry grew 20% between 2010 and 2011, up from its constant growth rate of 17% between 2003 and 2009.[179] Currently electronics represent 30% of Mexico’s exports.[179]

Mexico produces the most automobiles of any North American nation.[180] The industry produces technologically complex components and engages in some research and development activities.[181] The “Big Three” (General Motors, Ford and Chrysler) have been operating in Mexico since the 1930s, while Volkswagen and Nissan built their plants in the 1960s.[182] In Puebla alone, 70 industrial part-makers cluster around Volkswagen.[181] In the 2010s expansion of the sector was surging. In 2014 alone, more than $10 billion in investment was committed. Kia Motors in August 2014 announced plans for a $1 billion factory in Nuevo León. At the time Mercedes-Benz and Nissan were already building a $1.4 billion plant near Puebla, while BMW was planning a $1-billion assembly plant in San Luis Potosí. Additionally, Audi began building a $1.3 billion factory near Puebla in 2013.[183]

The domestic car industry is represented by DINA S.A., which has built buses and trucks since 1962,[184] and the new Mastretta company that builds the high-performance Mastretta MXT sports car.[185] In 2006, trade with the United States and Canada accounted for almost 50% of Mexico’s exports and 45% of its imports.[13] During the first three quarters of 2010, the United States had a $46.0 billion trade deficit with Mexico.[186] In August 2010 Mexico surpassed France to become the 9th largest holder of US debt.[187] The commercial and financial dependence on the US is a cause for concern.[188]

The remittances from Mexican citizens working in the United States account for 0.2% of Mexico’s GDP[189] which was equal to US$20 billion per year in 2004 and is the tenth largest source of foreign income after oil, industrial exports, manufactured goods, electronics, heavy industry, automobiles, construction, food, banking and financial services.[190] According to Mexico’s central bank, remittances in 2008 amounted to $25bn.[191] Major players in the broadcasting industry are Televisa, the largest Spanish media company in the Spanish-speaking world,[192] and TV Azteca.

 

 

Mexico doubles down on pivot away from U.S. http://money.cnn.com/2017/04/03/news/economy/mexico-pivots-eu-trade-talks/index.html?sr=twCNN040317mexico-pivots-eu-trade-talks0200PMStoryLink&linkId=36131028

Mexico is about to take another step to pivot its economy away from the U.S. and President Trump.

Mexican officials kick off talks with their counterparts in the European Union on Monday to update their own free trade agreement initially signed in 2000. Talks between the two sides have taken on a sense of urgency and are on an accelerated schedule now — the first time Mexico and EU held these talks was in 2013.  Both sides had expressed a desire for a new agreement for years, but only announced “accelerated” trade talks shortly after Trump took office.

“It’s a shared desire to proceed as quickly as possible with this negotiation,” Andrew Standley, the European Union’s ambassador to Mexico, told CNNMoney in February in Mexico City.  That’s not all. Mexican officials head to Argentina later this week for the World Economic Forum’s Latin America summit where they will likely reiterate their interest in buying more goods — particularly corn and soy — from Brazil and Argentina instead of the United States.  Last week, Mexico’s deputy economic minister, Juan Carlos Baker, told the Financial Times that Mexico is already in talks with the two South American giants to strengthen trade ties.

“There is a lot of potential for a win-win situation,” Martin Redrado, Argentina’s former central bank president and director of Fundacion Capital, a non-profit research institute, told CNNMoney. “Mexico has always been welcome in Latin America.”

Mexico is not feeling so welcome in North America. Trump has threatened to use tariffs against Mexican imports and to withdraw from NAFTA, the trilateral free trade agreement that also includes Canada. (However, the Trump administration recently signaled it may not seek a wholesale rewrite).  Mexico is one of the biggest buyers of American corn and soy. Corn is a staple food to the Mexican diet, found in everywhere from taco stands to fine dining restaurants.  It’s a fortuitous time for Mexico to look south and east. Argentina and Brazil, two of the world’s most closed economies to trade, have leaders trying to shed protectionist policies for free trade. Argentine President Mauricio Macri eliminated tariffs last year on agricultural exports put in place by the country’s previous populist regime. Argentina just ended a recession, yet is growing slowly.

Related: Trump NAFTA memo offers first look at trade goals

In Brazil, President Michel Temer is seeking just about any measure to help boost the nation’s economy, which is suffering through record high unemployment and its longest recession in history. Europe is also eager to find more willing trade partners after talks on an ambitious trade deal with the U.S. — the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) — stalled well before Trump won office.  The challenges, experts say, is for Mexico to find areas where it complements — instead of competes with — its partners. As a major auto manufacturer, it may risk competing in Europe against auto giants like Daimler (DDAIF)’s Mercedes and BMW (BMWYY). And Argentina and Brazil are also auto production hubs.  But Volkswagen has its largest plant outside of Europe in Mexico, and BMW is slated to open a new facility in Mexico in 2019. For now, the relationship appears to benefit both sides.

Related: Europe rescues its huge free trade deal with Canada

However, most Mexican auto workers make parts — not the final car — so the key will be deciding which parts Mexico manufactures and which others produce to make all sides happy. Experts say the same complementary strategy has to be applied to agriculture to prevent lost jobs. Still, Mexico has already had free trade success with the European Union. Between 2005 and 2015, annual trade flows between the two doubled to $56 billion. Europe has represented 40% of total foreign investment in Mexico since 2000, according to EU officials and data.

 

Mexico is no “Third-Rate” back-ward developing country. Its economy is the Planet’s 15th largest GDP and the 11th largest by purchasing power parity. The country achieved ability to produce nuclear weapons grade uranium since 1970 and WSJ ranking of higher education, gives Mexico’s education institutions high marks. IPADE and EGADE, the business schools of Universidad Panamericana and of Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education respectively, were ranked in the top 10 in a survey conducted by The Wall Street Journal among recruiters outside the United States.[309]

Foreign Relations:

The foreign relations of Mexico are directed by the President of Mexico[130] and managed through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.[131] The principles of the foreign policy are constitutionally recognized in the Article 89, Section 10, which include: respect for international law and legal equality of states, their sovereignty and independence, non-intervention in the domestic affairs of other countries, peaceful resolution of conflicts, and promotion of collective security through active participation in international organizations.[130] Since the 1930s, the Estrada Doctrine has served as a crucial complement to these principles.[132]

Mexico is one of the founding members of several international organizations, most notably the United Nations,[133] the Organization of American States,[134] the Organization of Ibero-American States,[135] the OPANAL[136] and the Rio Group.[137] In 2008, Mexico contributed over 40 million dollars to the United Nations regular budget.[138] In addition, it was the only Latin American member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development since it joined in 1994 until Chile gained full membership in 2010.[139][140]

Mexico is considered a regional power[141][142] hence its presence in major economic groups such as the G8+5 and the G-20. In addition, since the 1990s Mexico has sought a reform of the United Nations Security Council and its working methods[143] with the support of Canada, Italy, Pakistan and other nine countries, which form a group informally called the Coffee Club.[144]

After the War of Independence, the relations of Mexico were focused primarily on the United States, its northern neighbor, largest trading partner,[145] and the most powerful actor in hemispheric and world affairs.[146] Mexico supported the Cuban government since its establishment in the early 1960s,[147] the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua during the late 1970s,[148] and leftist revolutionary groups in El Salvador during the 1980s.[149] Felipe Calderón‘s administration put a greater emphasis on relations with Latin America and the Caribbean.[150]

Military Power:

Global Firepower ranking, based largely on each nation’s potential conventional war-making capability across land, sea and air, not including nuclear, ranked Mexico as 31 of 126, with a score of 0.6286 (0.0000 being perfect). The ranking incorporates values related to resources, finances and geography and over 50 different factors.

Mexico has the capabilities to manufacture nuclear weapons, but abandoned this possibility with the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1968 and pledged to only use its nuclear technology for peaceful purposes.[158] In 1970, Mexico’s national institute for nuclear research successfully refined weapons grade uranium[159][not in citation given] which is used in the manufacture of nuclear weapons but in April 2010, Mexico agreed to turn over its weapons grade uranium to the United States.[160][161]

Historically, Mexico has remained neutral in international conflicts,[162] with the exception of World War II. However, in recent years some political parties have proposed an amendment of the Constitution in order to allow the Mexican Army, Air Force or Navy to collaborate with the United Nations in peacekeeping missions, or to provide military help to countries that officially ask for it.[163]

The Mexican Armed Forces have two branches: the Mexican Army (which includes the Mexican Air Force), and the Mexican Navy. The Mexican Armed Forces maintain significant infrastructure, including facilities for design, research, and testing of weapons, vehicles, aircraft, naval vessels, defense systems and electronics;[151][152] military industry manufacturing centers for building such systems, and advanced naval dockyards that build heavy military vessels and advanced missile technologies.[153]

In recent years, Mexico has improved its training techniques, military command and information structures and has taken steps to becoming more self-reliant in supplying its military by designing as well as manufacturing its own arms,[154] missiles,[152] aircraft,[155] vehicles, heavy weaponry, electronics,[151] defense systems,[151] armor, heavy military industrial equipment and heavy naval vessels.[156] Since the 1990s, when the military escalated its role in the war on drugs, increasing importance has been placed on acquiring airborne surveillance platforms, aircraft, helicopters, digital war-fighting technologies,[151] urban warfare equipment and rapid troop transport.[157]

Economic Power:

Mexico has the Planet’s 15th largest nominal GDP and the 11th largest by purchasing power parity. GDP annual average growth for the period of 1995–2002 was 5.1%.[87] Mexico’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in purchasing power parity (PPP) was estimated at US $2.2602 trillion in 2015. Mexico’s GDP in PPP per capita was US $18,714.05. Mexico is now firmly established as an upper middle-income country. After the slowdown of 2001 the country has recovered and has grown 4.2, 3.0 and 4.8 percent in 2004, 2005 and 2006,[170] even though it is considered to be well below Mexico’s potential growth.[171] Furthermore, after the 2008–2009 recession, the economy grew an average of 3.32 percent per year from 2010 to 2014.

According to a 2008 UN report the average income in a typical urbanized area of Mexico was $26,654, while the average income in rural areas just miles away was only $8,403.[177] Daily minimum wages are set annually by law and determined by zone; $67.29 Mexican pesos ($5.13 USD) in Zone A and $63.77 Mexican pesos ($4.86 USD) in Zone B.[178]

The electronics industry of Mexico has grown enormously within the last decade. Mexico has the sixth largest electronics industry in the world after China, United States, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. Mexico is the second largest exporter of electronics to the United States where it exported $71.4 billion worth of electronics in 2011.[179] The Mexican electronics industry is dominated by the manufacture and OEM design of televisions, displays, computers, mobile phones, circuit boards, semiconductors, electronic appliances, communications equipment and LCD modules. The Mexican electronics industry grew 20% between 2010 and 2011, up from its constant growth rate of 17% between 2003 and 2009.[179] Currently electronics represent 30% of Mexico’s exports.[179]

Mexico produces the most automobiles of any North American nation.[180] The industry produces technologically complex components and engages in some research and development activities.[181] The “Big Three” (General Motors, Ford and Chrysler) have been operating in Mexico since the 1930s, while Volkswagen and Nissan built their plants in the 1960s.[182] In Puebla alone, 70 industrial part-makers cluster around Volkswagen.[181] In the 2010s expansion of the sector was surging. In 2014 alone, more than $10 billion in investment was committed. Kia Motors in August 2014 announced plans for a $1 billion factory in Nuevo León. At the time Mercedes-Benz and Nissan were already building a $1.4 billion plant near Puebla, while BMW was planning a $1-billion assembly plant in San Luis Potosí. Additionally, Audi began building a $1.3 billion factory near Puebla in 2013.[183]

The domestic car industry is represented by DINA S.A., which has built buses and trucks since 1962,[184] and the new Mastretta company that builds the high-performance Mastretta MXT sports car.[185] In 2006, trade with the United States and Canada accounted for almost 50% of Mexico’s exports and 45% of its imports.[13] During the first three quarters of 2010, the United States had a $46.0 billion trade deficit with Mexico.[186] In August 2010 Mexico surpassed France to become the 9th largest holder of US debt.[187] The commercial and financial dependence on the US is a cause for concern.[188]

The remittances from Mexican citizens working in the United States account for 0.2% of Mexico’s GDP[189] which was equal to US$20 billion per year in 2004 and is the tenth largest source of foreign income after oil, industrial exports, manufactured goods, electronics, heavy industry, automobiles, construction, food, banking and financial services.[190] According to Mexico’s central bank, remittances in 2008 amounted to $25bn.[191] Major players in the broadcasting industry are Televisa, the largest Spanish media company in the Spanish-speaking world,[192] and TV Azteca.

 

 

Mexico doubles down on pivot away from U.S. http://money.cnn.com/2017/04/03/news/economy/mexico-pivots-eu-trade-talks/index.html?sr=twCNN040317mexico-pivots-eu-trade-talks0200PMStoryLink&linkId=36131028

Mexico is about to take another step to pivot its economy away from the U.S. and President Trump.

Mexican officials kick off talks with their counterparts in the European Union on Monday to update their own free trade agreement initially signed in 2000. Talks between the two sides have taken on a sense of urgency and are on an accelerated schedule now — the first time Mexico and EU held these talks was in 2013.  Both sides had expressed a desire for a new agreement for years, but only announced “accelerated” trade talks shortly after Trump took office.

“It’s a shared desire to proceed as quickly as possible with this negotiation,” Andrew Standley, the European Union’s ambassador to Mexico, told CNNMoney in February in Mexico City.  That’s not all. Mexican officials head to Argentina later this week for the World Economic Forum’s Latin America summit where they will likely reiterate their interest in buying more goods — particularly corn and soy — from Brazil and Argentina instead of the United States.  Last week, Mexico’s deputy economic minister, Juan Carlos Baker, told the Financial Times that Mexico is already in talks with the two South American giants to strengthen trade ties.

“There is a lot of potential for a win-win situation,” Martin Redrado, Argentina’s former central bank president and director of Fundacion Capital, a non-profit research institute, told CNNMoney. “Mexico has always been welcome in Latin America.”

Mexico is not feeling so welcome in North America. Trump has threatened to use tariffs against Mexican imports and to withdraw from NAFTA, the trilateral free trade agreement that also includes Canada. (However, the Trump administration recently signaled it may not seek a wholesale rewrite).  Mexico is one of the biggest buyers of American corn and soy. Corn is a staple food to the Mexican diet, found in everywhere from taco stands to fine dining restaurants.  It’s a fortuitous time for Mexico to look south and east. Argentina and Brazil, two of the world’s most closed economies to trade, have leaders trying to shed protectionist policies for free trade. Argentine President Mauricio Macri eliminated tariffs last year on agricultural exports put in place by the country’s previous populist regime. Argentina just ended a recession, yet is growing slowly.

Related: Trump NAFTA memo offers first look at trade goals

In Brazil, President Michel Temer is seeking just about any measure to help boost the nation’s economy, which is suffering through record high unemployment and its longest recession in history. Europe is also eager to find more willing trade partners after talks on an ambitious trade deal with the U.S. — the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) — stalled well before Trump won office.  The challenges, experts say, is for Mexico to find areas where it complements — instead of competes with — its partners. As a major auto manufacturer, it may risk competing in Europe against auto giants like Daimler (DDAIF)’s Mercedes and BMW (BMWYY). And Argentina and Brazil are also auto production hubs.  But Volkswagen has its largest plant outside of Europe in Mexico, and BMW is slated to open a new facility in Mexico in 2019. For now, the relationship appears to benefit both sides.

Related: Europe rescues its huge free trade deal with Canada

However, most Mexican auto workers make parts — not the final car — so the key will be deciding which parts Mexico manufactures and which others produce to make all sides happy. Experts say the same complementary strategy has to be applied to agriculture to prevent lost jobs. Still, Mexico has already had free trade success with the European Union. Between 2005 and 2015, annual trade flows between the two doubled to $56 billion. Europe has represented 40% of total foreign investment in Mexico since 2000, according to EU officials and data.

 

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