Devin Nunes, Trump’s Boy Head at House Russia Gate Hearing, Much of His Future Election Money Likely Gone

April 3, 2017

The Communications/Electronics, Defense, Casino Gambling, all industries core to the California economy, is responsible for much of the funds Nunes has to run his campaign and likely gone for next election, as California is more liberal & progressive state & given Nunes embarrassing being Trump’s puppet performance at the House Intelligence Committee. This mean the money will have to come from Trump’s ally who remembers Nunes helping Trump. How will this money fare up to money going to those who challenges Nunes?

Who is Nunes?

Devin Gerald Nunes, (born October 1, 1973), is a Republican U.S. Representative for California’s 22nd congressional district, serving since 2003. He serves as chairman of the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and served as a member of President Trump’s Transition Team.[2] Nunes’s district, numbered as the 21st from 2003 to 2013, is in the San Joaquin Valley and includes most of western Tulare County and much of eastern Fresno County. He was reelected in 2016,[3] having run unopposed by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. He is currently defending against allegations that he inappropriately handled President Trump’s unsupported wiretapping claims against President Obama.[4]

Controversy over Nunes’s actions as head of the House Intelligence Committee

On March 22, 2017, Nunes stated that “the intelligence community incidentally collected information” regarding communications between Donald Trump and his team as part of their surveillance of foreign agents. Despite being the head of the committee investigating links between Trump and Russia, Nunes, in an unusual move, went to the White House (after consulting with Paul Ryan) to provide this information to the president. At the same time he failed to share the information with his Democratic colleagues on the House Intelligence Committee.[48] According to Nunes, the intercepted communications came in November, December and January — during the period after Trump won the election but before he was sworn in as president — and were not illegal.[citation needed] Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the committee, said he had “grave concerns” about Nunes’s actions and described them as a “profound irregularity”.[49]

In February 2017, he was the first leading House Republican to deny that the intelligence community has evidence of contacts between Russian operatives and the Trump campaign – having also served on the Trump Transition Team.[43] Nunes has rejected repeated calls for an investigation by a select committee, saying that such a committee isn’t needed.[44][45] He has said that the House will not engage in a “witch hunt” and that “at this point, there’s nothing there.”[45] He also rejected calls that he request Trump’s tax returns.[43] Nunes was a member of the Trump transition team and, at the request of a White House communications aide, spoke to a Wall Street Journal reporter to challenge a story about the Trump campaign’s connections to Russia.[46]

After Trump’s national security adviser Michael T. Flynn resigned after it was revealed that he had covertly communicated with Russian officials, Nunes said he would not seek to investigate Flynn’s ties to Russia.[47] Nunes said, “From everything that I can see, his conversations with the Russian ambassador — he was doing this country a favor, and he should be thanked for it.”[47]

Controversy over Nunes’s actions as head of the House Intelligence Committee

On March 22, 2017, Nunes stated that “the intelligence community incidentally collected information” regarding communications between Donald Trump and his team as part of their surveillance of foreign agents. Despite being the head of the committee investigating links between Trump and Russia, Nunes, in an unusual move, went to the White House (after consulting with Paul Ryan) to provide this information to the president. At the same time he failed to share the information with his Democratic colleagues on the House Intelligence Committee.[48] According to Nunes, the intercepted communications came in November, December and January — during the period after Trump won the election but before he was sworn in as president — and were not illegal.[citation needed] Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the committee, said he had “grave concerns” about Nunes’s actions and described them as a “profound irregularity”.[49]

Although he ran unopposed, he received over $1.6 million from PACs for his campaign committee.[5]

Total PAC Money for 2015-2016: $1,628,895
Number of Contributions: 816

Agribusiness $134,200
Communications/Electronics $107,500
Construction $35,500
Defense $97,500
Energy & Natural Resources $180,500
Finance, Insurance & Real Estate $434,000
Health $310,500
Lawyers & Lobbyists $24,000
Transportation $72,469
Misc Business $183,200
Ideological/Single-Issue $47,026
Other

Top 20 Industries contributing to Campaign Cmte and Leadership PAC

Insurance $239,375 $2,875 $236,500
Crop Production & Basic Processing $190,475 $135,775 $54,700
Health Professionals $173,400 $33,400 $140,000
Securities & Investment $155,188 $54,188 $101,000
Electric Utilities $142,000 $0 $142,000
Pharmaceuticals/Health Products $138,500 $0 $138,500
Casinos/Gambling $123,400 $96,200 $27,200
Real Estate $116,350 $48,850 $67,500
Lobbyists $100,839 $98,839 $2,000
Oil & Gas $88,500 $500 $88,000
Commercial Banks $82,938 $1,438 $81,500
Health Services/HMOs $79,300 $8,300 $71,000
Defense Aerospace $78,500 $500 $78,000
Misc Manufacturing & Distributing $74,400 $5,400 $69,000
Beer, Wine & Liquor $67,761 $9,700 $58,061
Dairy $62,350 $36,850 $25,500
Lawyers/Law Firms $59,766 $25,266 $34,500
Agricultural Services/Products $59,200 $22,700 $36,500
Accountants $59,000 $2,000 $57,000
Retail Sales


Sector Totals

Sector Total PACs Indivs
Agribusiness $400,450 $167,700 $232,750
Communications/Electronics $156,000 $155,500 $500
Construction $75,750 $40,500 $35,250
Defense $164,500 $164,000 $500
Energy & Natural Resources $273,400 $255,500 $17,900
Finance, Insurance & Real Estate $698,301 $582,000 $116,301
Health $439,600 $390,500 $49,100
Lawyers & Lobbyists $160,605 $36,500 $124,105
Transportation $104,469 $94,969 $9,500
Misc Business $407,399 $265,761 $141,638
Labor $0 $0 $0
Ideological/Single-Issue $72,228 $61,028 $11,200
Other $38,250 $2,500 $35,750

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Download: View Top 20 | Top 100Click on arrows to view detailed data.
Rank Contributor Hires lobbyists? Lobbying firm?* Lobbyist(s)
give to
member?
Total Indivs PACs
1 Edison International $27,500 $0 $27,500
2 Blue Cross/Blue Shield $23,500 $0 $23,500
3 Northrop Grumman $20,500 $500 $20,000
4 UBS AG $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Investment Co Institute $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Home Depot $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Amgen Inc $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 General Atomics $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Emerson Electric $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Ambulatory Surgery Center Assn $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Raytheon Co $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Koch Industries $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Verizon Communications $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 National Assn of Real Estate Investment Trusts $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 New York Life Insurance $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Lockheed Martin $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 AT&T Inc $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Bank of America $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 American Bankers Assn $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 McKesson Corp $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Honeywell International $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 PG&E Corp $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Automotive Free International Trade PAC $20,000 $0 $20,000
4 Boeing Co $20,000 $0 $20,000

*registrants, or active lobbying firm

This table lists the top donors to this candidate in the 2015-2016 election cycle. The organizations themselves did not donate, rather the money came from the organizations’ PACs, their individual members or employees or owners, and those individuals’ immediate families. Organization totals include subsidiaries and affiliates.

Why (and How) We Use Donors’ Employer/Occupation Information

METHODOLOGY

NOTE: All the numbers on this page are for the 2015-2016 election cycle and based on Federal Election Commission data available electronically on Wednesday, February 01, 2017. (“Help! The numbers don’t add up…”)

Feel free to distribute or cite this material, but please credit the Center for Responsive Politics. For permission to reprint for commercial uses, such as textbooks, contact the Center.

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